• October 2008 - Volume 11, Number 3

    Features

    Management and restrictive hunting techniques have helped this Natchez landowner grow some really big bucks.

    J.H. James of Natchez, owner and operator of the 2,000-acre Ellislee Plantation on the Homochitto River, has proven that anyone can have numbers of big-antlered Texas-style trophy bucks on his hunting lands, if he knows how to properly manage his deer herd.

    There are ways to hunt rubs to help ensure you’ll be dragging a buck out of the woods this season.

    Nothing excites a deer hunter more than finding a hot rub site. Seeing one glaring in the morning sunlight gives a similar warmth to the body like a NASCAR driver hearing the “start your engines” command and watching the green flag waving in the wind.

    Locate these foods in October, and you’ll soon be drawing your bow on a buck to be proud of.

    Deer hunting the early archery season in Mississippi is quite a bit different in some ways than hunting the rut or late-season. Bucks in October won’t be fighting for does; rather, some will still be in bachelor groups. It is not uncommon to see several bucks hanging out and traveling together this time of year.

    As water temperatures begin to cool this month, crappie move back to the shallows to stock up for the winter. Try these tips to get in on the action.

    “The key to this is to be quiet,” said Magnolia Crappie Clubber and tournament angler Monty Blount of Byram. “The crappie have moved back up to the shallows this time of year, and they’re staking out these snags ready to ambush passing baitfish.

    Deer communicate with each other through scents that hunters try to replicate. Here’s how to make sure you’re saying the right things.

    Without a doubt, the sense of smell is the most important physical perception available to the white-tailed deer. Deer rely heavily on their noses to detect the presence of predators and locate food sources.

    Deer communicate with each other through scents that hunters try to replicate. Here’s how to make sure you’re saying the right things.

    Without a doubt, the sense of smell is the most important physical perception available to the white-tailed deer. Deer rely heavily on their noses to detect the presence of predators and locate food sources.

    This hunter’s tactics help him put dozens of hunters of trophy bucks every year.

    Although 240 bowhunters took 82 deer at Willow Point last year, another 50 hunters shot and missed deer. We also try to take two does for every one buck harvested on our lands, but last year we didn’t meet this goal. We harvested only 138 does.

    Every hunter gets excited when he sees a big rub, but effectively hunting these signposts takes a bit of work. It's all a labor of love.