• August 2012 - Volume 15, Number 1

    Features

    Everyone knows testosterone often rules the male psyche. So how does this vital hormone — and the mates they pursue — affect bucks during the rut?

    The rut is on. Mature bucks, if not pursuing does, are tending and breeding estrous females.

    The playing field has many contenders; yet one particular buck is not only dominating a given area with two different doe groups, but his body size is exceedingly large — even to the point of abnormality.

    As he tends a doe, his entire body from forehead to the hindquarters is swollen. It appears as though his body and neck have been stuffed with pillows.

    Deer camp work days might not be the most-exciting thing in the world, but it’s a necessary evil. Here’s how best to ensure everything is ready for the first day of the upcoming hunting season.

    Deer camps are great fun. That is, at least until all the work starts.

    Even then, sweat equity ought to be considered an investment in the value of the property, if not a major component of enhancing the quality of the annual hunting experience.

    As hunters know, this time of year means deer hunting season is drawing ever closer: It’s deer camp prep time.

    Getting deer camps properly prepped for the hunting season is, in large measure, a matter of attitude. The more positive the attitude, then, the better the results and the accompanying pride of accomplishment.

    Map out your next crappie trip to this great crappie reservoir.

    Located within the Golden Triangle of Northeast Mississippi, this month’s Mississippi crappie hotspot is none other than Columbus Lake. Referred to by the locals as Possum Town Lake, Columbus is impounded by the seventh of 10 locks along the Tenn-Tom Waterway. The Tenn-Tom Waterway forms a 234-mile-long, 300-feet-wide-by-9 feet-deep transportation artery connecting West-central Alabama and Northeastern Mississippi. Although created and maintained by the United State Army Corps of Engineers as part of a commercial shipping artery for the Southeast United States, Columbus for the most part has managed to slide under the radar as a nationally recognized top-notch crappie lake.

    Head to your favorite lake after the sun sets, and pull out the largest worm you can find to catch huge bass in the dark.

    As the last rays of light faded away at dusk, a seasoned angler cast a magnum worm into the depths and let it glide slowly toward the bottom some 15 to 17 feet down.

    Working the Mann’s Grape Jelly Worm back over the submerged ledge, he hesitated an instant as it climbed over the brush top.

    Thump came the telltale strike of a bass as it inhaled the worm.

    Neshoba County Lake might be on the small side, but it’s packed with trophy bass. Here’s how to put those monsters in your boat.

    Neshoba County has a storied past: It has been the setting for murder mysteries, real and fictional, and is home to the famous annual Neshoba County Fair.

    Just southeast of the county seat of Philadelphia is Neshoba County Lake. An unassuming 138-acre impoundment, the lake offers no great mysteries, just the facts — it is becoming one of the best bass lakes in all of Mississippi.

    Neshoba County Lake is small by many standards, with a curious shape and bottom contour. It is a shallow lake, with some areas being difficult to reach. Mats of heavy vegetation cover several acres of the lake’s surface.

    Head south this month to sightfish for tripletail right off the Mississippi coast.

    Tripletail have made an impression on Capt. Kenny Shiyou.

    “I tell everybody: ‘If I was a wealthy man, that’s all I would fish,’” Shiyou swore.

    And a fellow would have to be rolling in it to be able to afford enough gas to run crab buoys out in the Mississippi Sound all day long.

    You see, tripletail can be ubiquitous and evanescent at the same time.

    On one hand, they can be found just about anywhere off the coast of Mississippi. On the other, they can be here today and gone tomorrow.

    It's time to head to the camp for work days in preparation for the 2012-13 hunting season.