• November 2013 - Volume 16, Number 4

    Features

    Before bucks go stark-raving mad with lust is a great time to put some meat in the freezer. Here’s how to ambush deer during the prerut.

    Outdoor writers often fail readers by making assumptions, such as using terminology that only seasoned deer hunters would understand. For example, using “choose a stand location on an active trail between a bedding area and a food source” without defining a bedding area or the food source fails the new deer hunter. 

    November marks the point of deer season when everyone — not just bowhunters — can get in on the chase. Here’s what you need to know.

    George Arrington scoured the woods looking for the flick of a tail, a twitch of an ear, or the glint of an antler, anything resembling a buck during the 2012 youth deer season. Deer started moving in to feed near his stand, intensifying the young hunter’s excitement. 

    Deer management has been all the rage in recent years, and that has sparked much debate about what bucks should and shouldn’t be taken. Here are some thoughts.

    Patiently you wait, enduring the cold conditions. Finally the woodland silence is broken by the slight rustling of withered leaves as the game you’ve been pursuing makes its presence known.

    It’s hunter’s choice this month, as rifle and primitive-weapons seasons are added to the bow-hunting mix. So which is the best choice? It all depends.

    Mississippi is one of the best places in the country to deer hunt. Our seasons are long, from October through February, our bag limits liberal with five does and three bucks. We have nearly two million acres of public hunting lands including 51 state wildlife management areas, seven national forests and 11 National Wildlife Refuges.

    Forget spring — there might be no better time to catch slab crappie at Lake Pickwick than right now.

    Renowned fishing guide Brad Whitehead has never considered himself one of the crowd. 

    All Tony Mills knew when he arrowed this buck was that it was a great deer -- but it could be the new Warren County record.