• Catfish

    Mississippi’s noodling, or hand-grabbing season for catfish, opened May 1 and ends July 15, making June the peak month for hands-on action.

    Noodling (a.k.a. hand-grabbing) peaks in June

    One of the few freshwater fishing seasons in Mississippi is the hands-on noodling season for catfish. It opened May 1 and will close on July 15, making June the peak month for activity.

    June 15 at 6:00am
    Whether you seek trophy catfish or fryers, one of these methods will fit the bill for your summertime action.

    Summer Cats 5 Ways

    As hard as it may be to believe, catfish are one of the most versatile quarries with whom anglers can ever hope to do battle. While most people think of them as slimy creatures that lurk on the bottom in the mud, catfish represent all of the characteristics as top-of-the-food-chain predators, finicky tournament day foes, and main course for a fish fry all rolled up into one.

    June 01 at 7:00am
    Often left bloody from battling a giant flathead catfish, Hannah Barron says the adrenaline rush she gets from noodling is worth the pain.

    The adrenaline rush that is hand-grabbing

    Hannah Barron dove underwater hoping to feel a big catfish in a wooden box, and she got just what she wanted.

    May 01 at 7:00am
    Ken Covington swings a nice blue cat into Capt. Bob Crosby’s Blue Cat Guide Service charter boat on the Mississippi River near Vicksburg.

    Singing the blues — Keys to the Mississippi River’s monster catfish

    Capt. Bob Crosby motored out to the Mississippi River and we were greeted with beautiful marmalade-colored skies and crisp, cold weather as a cold front of passed through.

    March 01 at 7:00am

    These giant catfish have become pigeon hunters

    Catfish are not picky eaters. They are known to eat a wide variety of foods, including seeds, crawfish, insects, frogs and other fish. When food is scarce they will even scour the bottom for decomposing fish or bugs. So when some pigeons wander too close to the shore it's no surprise these European catfish have learned to seize the opportunity for a hearty meal.

    February 24 at 12:00pm
    A channel catfish olfactory senses are nearly 10 times greater than those of a largemouth bass or rainbow trout, making stinkbaits an effective tool for catching them.

    Channel cats love a stinky sticky bait

    While many die hard catfish anglers make their own concoctions of stink baits, a tried and true favorite is a product called Sonny’s Super Sticky Channel Catfish Bait. The bait comes in either 15-ounce jars or 45-ounce tubs and is designed especially for catching channel catfish.

    November 15, 2016 at 6:00am
    Anglers can try their hand at homemade stinkbaits by trying this easy to make recipe.

    The No. 1 recipe for catfish stink bait

    Many family recipes are handed down from generation to generation. Some recipes make it to the Thanksgiving table while others, like this one from Robert “Kud” Stevenson of Tallulah, La., wind up on a hook. 

    November 15, 2016 at 6:00am
    Don Drane stays busy overseeing 25 yo-yos on Lake Washington, and he always leaves with a cooler filled with “eating-sized” channel catfish.

    Tail-gating cats — Fishing tips for Lake Washington catfish

    If you have never attended a combination fish fry and football tailgate party in Mississippi, you have missed out on one of life’s great pleasures. The state is well represented when its colleges are on the field and catfish fillets are in the fryer.

    November 01, 2016 at 7:00am
    When times are lean for fresh-cut herring, you can try this garlic chicken recipe to tempt blue catfish.

    Garlic chicken is top catfish bait

    The hands-down favorite bait for catfishing on the Mississippi River is skipjack herring. Herring are usually plentiful but get harder to find when winter rolls around.

    October 15, 2016 at 7:00am
    Mississippi River catfish guide Boy Crosby said he realized early on the potential fishing that was right under his nose.

    Two great catfish rigs

    Veteran Catfish guide Rodger Taylor use completely different rigs depending on whether he is fishing at anchor for catfish or when drifting or trolling for cats. 

    October 15, 2016 at 7:00am
    Moderating water levels and falling water temperatures typically provide the combination of conditions that Bob Crosby loves to see on the Mississippi River, and often leaves him with his hands and arms full of catfish.

    Bumping for catfish

    Bumping, also referred to as slipping, dragging, and back trolling, has recently created a lot of buzz in the catfish world. 

    October 15, 2016 at 7:00am
    October is a great time to head to the Mississippi River to get a case of the blues, as in blue catfish.

    Catching the blues — Top fishing tips for blue catfish

    Bob Crosby of Madison has been fishing the Mississippi River along the outskirts of the town of Vicksburg for over 15 years. Crosby is a catfishing guide who realized early the potential that was sitting right under his nose.

    October 01, 2016 at 7:00am
    Every bend in the river has a deep bank and a shallow bar, which is where this big blue cat ate a big chunk of cut shad and wound up at the cleaning table.

    Expert catfishing advice

    Andy Smith of Greene County has fished the Pascagoula for more than 30 years and has some advice for those fishing the river for the first time.

    August 15, 2016 at 7:00am
    Deanna Simkins of Madison boats a flathead that took a live bream. Flatheads, highly favored for good taste favor a live meal.

    Catfish caliphate — Tips for catfishing on the Pascagoula River

    The Pascagoula is far from the longest river in Mississippi, running only 80 miles from the convergence of the Chickasawhay and Leaf rivers to where it empties into the Gulf of Mexico without great fanfare. 

    August 01, 2016 at 7:00am
    One of the most popular catfish tactics over the last few years is a back trolling presentation known as bumping.

    Bumping for cats

    Catfish tactics have come a long and varied path from the days of just casting out lines and waiting for ol’ whisker-face to come strolling along. From trolling to casting, even getting in the water and noodling for them, catfish are becoming a more popular target.

    The most recent big fish tactic is called bumping. 

    July 15, 2016 at 7:00am
    Pickwick’s flathead catfish are usually caught hiding behind current breaks near the dams on either end of the Lake.

    How to fish the Santee catfish rig

    Larger catfish, particularly trophy-sized blue cats that are popular with a lot of anglers, are a lot more nomadic than most anglers give them credit. These fish have been compared to cattle, just wandering along travel corridors, grazing as they move from place to place.

    The best way to target roaming catfish is by trolling for them. 

    July 15, 2016 at 7:00am