During the construction of Okhissa Lake, several humps were pushed up around the lake bottom, and several rock beds were created with railroad ties and loads of gravel.

Patrick Engerran knows some people who actually walked the lake before it flooded to secure all the secrets that would eventually be hidden under the water’s surface.

“That’s great if you were able to do that,” he said, “but with Google Earth, you can go back in time to see exactly what’s down there and exactly where it is.”

Google Earth has a feature that acts like a time machine, an icon that looks like a little clock with a clockwise arrow at the top of the Google Earth window where tools are located.

“There aren’t any maps for Okhissa, so this is a great option for helping you figure out the lake,” Engerran said. “You can go all the way back to 2005, 2006 and 2007 to see the lake before it was flooded and in the different stages as it started filling up.”

Engerran has found fishing spots at Okhissa by spotting something interesting on Google Earth and getting the GPS coordinates by hovering his curser directly over the spot. 

Then, he manually adds the coordinates to the GPS in his boat, and it takes him right to the spot.

“You can see every channel swing, hump, stumps on the side of the channel — whatever you want to see that you think might hold a fish,” Engerran said.

He also uses the time machine on Google Earth to find clean water on the Pearl River. 

“Let’s say I’m fishing there this Saturday and it’s muddy,” he said. “I’ll go to Google Earth and go back in time to when everything was muddy, then look for clean water. If those spots were clean then, odds are they’ll probably be clean this Saturday. It’s a great tool for getting the edge on the bass.”