No matter the weapon, practice

Spending time at the range or in the back yard shooting your bow and/or gun will help you make that critical shot once the season opens.
Spending time at the range or in the back yard shooting your bow and/or gun will help you make that critical shot once the season opens.

While you’re getting the land and your knowledge of it in shape, don’t forget about re-honing those shooting skills. Whether you hunt with modern firearm, bow or primitive weapon, putting practice time in at the range is a great idea.

Les Smith of Senatobia hunts near his home in Senatobia and sets the property up for some long shots, even out to the 400-yard range.

“We’ve got some permanent shooting houses where we can see 400 to 500 yards,” he said. “That kind of shot isn’t for everyone, but if you don’t practice at that range, you’ll never make that shot when it counts.”

While having a steady rest and reliable equipment are keys to accurate hunting, toning muscle strength for bow season is a real asset for archers like Chuck Wilson of Columbus.

“I try to shoot year-round, but I get my bow out at least two months ahead of time, so by late July or August, I start shooting 15 or 20 shots in the afternoon after work,” Wilson said. “I don’t just stand and shoot, either. I get out one of my ladder stands and move it around and try to think of real-life shots I may have to make, like shooting to my weak side or behind me or leaning out to shoot around a limb. That way I know I can make a tough shot or if I need to wait for a better one.”

Phillip Gentry
About Phillip Gentry 365 Articles
Phillip Gentry is a freelance outdoor writer and photographer who says that if it swims, walks, hops, flies or crawls he’s usually not too far behind.

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